Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan Genghis Khan was the founder of the Mongol Empire the largest continuous land empire ever On his death in this extended from the Near East to the Yellow Sea and was expanded by his successors

  • Title: Genghis Khan
  • Author: Paul Ratchnevsky Thomas Nivison Haining
  • ISBN: 9780631189497
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Paperback
  • Genghis Khan was the founder of the Mongol Empire, the largest continuous land empire ever On his death in 1227, this extended from the Near East to the Yellow Sea, and was expanded by his successors to include what is now Iran, Iraq and southern Russia By 1206, Genghis Khan had completed the unification by conquest of all the tribes of Mongolia, and was acclaimed as uniGenghis Khan was the founder of the Mongol Empire, the largest continuous land empire ever On his death in 1227, this extended from the Near East to the Yellow Sea, and was expanded by his successors to include what is now Iran, Iraq and southern Russia By 1206, Genghis Khan had completed the unification by conquest of all the tribes of Mongolia, and was acclaimed as universal Khan He then launched his assault on Northern China Peking was captured in 1215, and the Chin were finally subjugated by Genghis s successors in 1234 This is the definitive biography.
    • Best Read [Paul Ratchnevsky Thomas Nivison Haining] ✓ Genghis Khan || [Memoir Book] PDF ☆
      159 Paul Ratchnevsky Thomas Nivison Haining
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Paul Ratchnevsky Thomas Nivison Haining] ✓ Genghis Khan || [Memoir Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Paul Ratchnevsky Thomas Nivison Haining
      Published :2019-04-26T14:35:22+00:00

    932 Comment

    • Jan-Maat says:

      This is a translation of Ratchnevsky's 1978 book originally written in German. The oddity is that it was decided to edit the work, reducing it's length, writing some of the notes into the text and changing footnotes to endnotes (view spoiler)[ there are 58 pages of endnotes for 213 pages of text(hide spoiler)]. The end result is a choppy sea rather than plain sailing. Apparently this was done to increase its appeal to that mysterious yet much pursued beast the 'general reader' (view spoiler)[ to [...]

    • Bryn Hammond says:

      I have severe issues with this book. It's the standard biography of Genghis/Chinggis Khan, and how I wish that wasn't so. On a positive note, it's stuffed full of information. Its most egregious negative: have other people noticed this weird habit? Time and again he writes a paragraph, and at the end tacks on a sentence, 'which was because he was a power-mad tyrant'. And you go, eh? Where'd that come from? As a conclusion there's nothing to suggest he was, in the paragraph. Or at least, the fact [...]

    • John says:

      A 2.5

    • William Kim says:

      Beginning this book, I had very little knowledge of Genghis Khan. I appreciate Ratchnevsky's attention to historical detail and the clear laying out of various primary sources' perspectives. I feel like I've gotten a nice picture of the historical timeline of his conquests and his personality, which is exactly what I wanted.However, the prose felt too academic given that the content was relatively straightforward (this may be the result of this being a translation). There's also some amount of r [...]

    • Tommy says:

      This book was fairly dry and seemed to skip around and have some wholes but that seems to be due to the nature of the book.It's dry because it's a history book. There are some wholes because it's from the 12th and 13th century and records are spotty from then and there is not general consensus for many events in Khan's lifeThat being said this was written very well and a narrative thread was drawn surprisingly well. I appreciate Ratchnevsky's explanations of where the major histories differ and [...]

    • Rob says:

      I encountered this book as an assignment in a university level Chinese History course. Another reviewer pointed out that this is not a biography or a narrative; rather, it is an academic investigation of several primary sources into Genghis Khan's life and legacy. Throughout, it assumes that you are already familiar with the broad strokes of Inner Asian history, and I felt like the assumption was there that the reader had already read and considered the Secret History of the Mongols and the writ [...]

    • John says:

      This is not so much a story-driven book as it is an academic investigation. For much of Genghis's life, there are only a couple sources, and of course they often present conflicting information. In such cases, the author tells you what each of the sources says, then provides his conclusion. This approach slows the paces and disrupts the story, but to do otherwise when the facts are unclear and require analysis is to mislead the reader. The book covers Genghis's entire life, plus a chapter about [...]

    • Tawni says:

      I read this intermittently for 2 years. It was difficult to keep track of the different names in the beginning since there were also few annunciations. The story of Genghis Khan is pretty amazing. His rise from nothing to supreme power is brutal but his goal was not just self-interest, also union. He respected other religions, beliefs and cultures and when conquering used this to his and his peoples advantage. A bloody history led by a brilliant man.

    • Kione says:

      Confusing.Dry.I felt that the writer couldn't decide whether to write a historical or a drama.There was some interesting parts.

    • Elizabeth Reid says:

      Very interesting bio about Genghis Khan. Also a great book to read about the early Mongols.

    • Walt says:

      This is a unique perspective on the warlord. It is based on sources from Central Russia (Uigyr) rather than the Persian (Il-Khan) sources. Good for compare/contrast.

    • Tony says:

      Ratchnevsky shows mastery of the available sources. The translation is well-sized and well-paced.

    • Stephen Brunskill says:

      Pretty good book ; Thomas Haining brings Paul Ratchevsky's highly cited German 1978 book to a broader market. Dense (60 pages of endnotes!), but quite readable to any anyone interested in history.

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