In the Empire of Genghis Khan: An Amazing Odyssey Through the Lands of the Most Feared Conquerors in History

In the Empire of Genghis Khan An Amazing Odyssey Through the Lands of the Most Feared Conquerors in History Vivid hilarious and compelling this eagerly awaited book takes its place among the travel classics It is a thrilling tale of adventure a comic masterpiece and an evocative portrait of a medieval

  • Title: In the Empire of Genghis Khan: An Amazing Odyssey Through the Lands of the Most Feared Conquerors in History
  • Author: StanleyStewart
  • ISBN: 9781592281060
  • Page: 420
  • Format: Paperback
  • Vivid, hilarious, and compelling, this eagerly awaited book takes its place among the travel classics It is a thrilling tale of adventure, a comic masterpiece, and an evocative portrait of a medieval land marooned in the modern world Eight and a half centuries ago, under Genghis Khan, the Mongols burst forth from Central Asia in a series of spectacular conquests that tooVivid, hilarious, and compelling, this eagerly awaited book takes its place among the travel classics It is a thrilling tale of adventure, a comic masterpiece, and an evocative portrait of a medieval land marooned in the modern world Eight and a half centuries ago, under Genghis Khan, the Mongols burst forth from Central Asia in a series of spectacular conquests that took them from the Danube to the Yellow Sea Their empire was seen as the final triumph of the nomadic barbarians In this remarkable book Stanley Stewart sets off on a pilgrimage across the old empire, from Istanbul to the distant homeland of the Mongol hordes The heart of his odyssey is a thousand mile ride, traveling by horse, through trackless land.On a journey full of bizarre characters and unexpected encounters, he crosses the desert and mountains of central Asia to arrive at the windswept grasslands of the steppes, the birthplace of Genghis Khan.
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    183 Comment

    • Daren says:

      Another of Stanley Stewart's excellent travel books - this one won the Thomas Cook Travel Book award in 2001. Here the author heads for Mongolia, by horse, using the well tested Orto system, like the messengers of Genghis Khan - hiring horses and a guide to travel a short distance, before being passed to a new guide with new horses - sensible, in that neither the guide nor the horses are taken out of their comfort zone, nor sphere of knowledge.The author commences in Istanbul (ok not on horse ye [...]

    • Nina Ive says:

      While I had expected this book to be a pilgrimage to the homelands of Genghis Khan, it was less about Genghis Khan and more about the nomadic way of life. The Irish author made the five month journey across Mongolia, through the Gobi desert by horse. He used a range of guides and interpreters along the way and stayed in the traditional Ger. He showed an incredible respect for their way of life, never flinching at the diet consisting of vodka, sheep parts (every part) and fermented milk (airag), [...]

    • Vinothraj J says:

      The most mentions of Genghis Khan in the book, were of Genghis Khan Vodka and its potency. Friar William's tale is mostly near the end of the book. A well-written book for travelogue fans, not for seekers of Mongolian history.

    • Yasmin says:

      A very interesting book with a very amusing account of the author's visit to Mongolia. He didn't side with any one historical version of the history of Mongolia, he wasn't biased or romantic or looked at any thing with rosy tinted glasses. He wrote what he saw and what people felt about Mongolia and the Mongolians. To modern travellers you could even say his methods in travelling and the people and how he met them was unorthodox and he didn't shy away from anything. If anything for me I wished t [...]

    • Suzanne Auckerman says:

      Great book! It validates so many experiences that I have had that when I tell people, their response is, "Yea! Sure". I read this on a flight that was diverted because of a medical emergency. I hope the person is fine, but I must admit the delay was fine as I was so involved in the book. Many times I laughed out.

    • Lisa says:

      If Stanley Stewart weren't so well behaved, I think I'd have given this book five stars. When he doesn't try so hard to be literary, Stewart tells some whopping good tales about his adventures crossing vast Mongolia on horseback.In the same paragraph, Stewart can delight and frustrate me. Here's an example of a passage that curdled my admiration: "The emptiness was startling. Mongolia made the sky, with its baroque clouds, seem clouded and fussy." That's all good. And then"A few trees appeared." [...]

    • Idiosyncratic says:

      I loved this book. It makes you think Mongolia is one of the most astonishing, enchanting places you could ever go. Unfortunately, to see it that way for yourself, you'd have to have Stanley Stewart right at your elbow, interpreting every experience for you along the way. This man is more of a poet than a travel writer. He makes even fairly mundane landscapes sound utterly breath-taking - e.g. "The country on the far side was inhabited by poplars standing spaciously apart, and we rode through th [...]

    • Lydia says:

      A fantastic work of travel literature. Stewart's writing is unusual in its combination of historical background on the region (central Asia) and astute/moving/hilarious observations on his interactions with the people that he runs into. A lot of travel lit sounds the same - "my amazing summer in ___," etc, but Stewart's trip across Central Asia is unique because the region is so unknown in general, and also because his own personal style of writing is so eclectic and fun - you have history, dial [...]

    • Erin says:

      I guess the wonderful thing about is that everyone can have an opinion. I, for one, loved Mr. Stewart's "florid" writing; it gave me hope that travelogues needn't all be staid and unromantic.It's an amusing and very knowledgeable look at a people that most of us know nothing about, told with candor and sympathy for a land that has never had a very easy time of things. Mongolia is on my bucket-list, and I'll be bringing this book along with me when I go. And some of my own tea. And maybe vodka. [...]

    • Josh says:

      Very entertaining. Some bloke who has not ridden a horse since childhood goes on a trek across Mongolia on horseback. Interwoven with the travelogue is Mongolian history, Genghis to post-Communist. Well written, I particularly enjoyed the author's turns of phrase. The wedding brawl was hilarious!!

    • Ben Rand says:

      Beautiful, lyrical account of a journey through lands most of us will never see. Read this as an introduction to the mysterious country of Mongolia, where my son will soon be living two years of his life.

    • keith koenigsberg says:

      Some of the best travel writing I have ever read: Stewart crossed Mongolia on horseback in 1991 and writes the encounters with quirky and exotic characters with great wit. Excellent.

    • Perry Whitford says:

      A rare, illuminating trek through one of the most isolated nations on Earth. Mongolia is huge in size, low on population, with a way of life virtually untouched by the march of civilizations, adhering to the same nomadic culture lived by Genghis Khan and his ancient descendants over millennia. Irishman Stanley follows the trail first traversed and chronicled by a Westerner in the mid 13th century, a fat french clergyman, Friar William of Rubruck, a number of years before Marci Polo did the same. [...]

    • Theresa says:

      I like good travel writing. And since anything about Mongolia was new to me, I found this book entertaining. Stewart has a good sense of humor and is a facile writer. He goes to Mongolia to experience the nomadic way of life. But the only picture he leaves you with of the Mongolian people is that the men are frequently blind drunk, the point of life is finding good pasturage for your sheep, and racing horses can be lots of fun. The people are friendly and hospitable. I expect there is more to it [...]

    • Odelia says:

      Serendipity and synchronicity conspired to put this gem of a read in my hands when I needed it most and the best books always have maps. The author captures his journey with so much insight and wit, I often smiled, chuckled or laughed out loud while obsessively finding time to turn the pages during a particularly busy time in my life. Beginning his trek in Istanbul, a city I have fallen in love with in recent years and am advised to not currently visit, Stanley Stewart will take you along on an [...]

    • Dan says:

      Mr. Stewart is a fine author and his knack for capturing comedic, ironic moments, inevitable on any long trip, made me laugh out loud frequently. On the downside, there were too many paragraphs that were identical in purpose and description. I don't know how many times a reader needs to understand that there were "baroque clouds", "low ridges", or "trailing shadows". Had he cut back a little on the excessively florid language, the book would have been better for it. Nonetheless, it is worth read [...]

    • Joyceling says:

      Fascinating account of travel from Istanbul to Mongolia east of Ulan Batur, primarily on horseback in Mongolia. Amusingly wry descriptions of current nomadic life along with reference to early travelers' reports. Living mostly on mutton, socializing and sleeping in "gers", and probably destroying his liver! This trip was made at the end of the 1990s after Mongolia's release from Russian rule." rs" and probably destroying his liver

    • Sue says:

      Motivated to read this book after seeing the 2007 film "Mongol," and intrigued by the its credentials as Thomas Cook Travel Book of the Year and Benjamin Franklin Award for Best Travel essay, I was still rather disappointed that the writer lingered for 3/4 of the book before reaching his goal then rushed through the very lands that defined and created the great Khan. Stewart may be in the mold of Kapuscinski and Bryson, but in this book he doesn't quite rise to either of them.

    • Snicketts says:

      Glorious! This is how to write travel books. Laugh out loud in places, in others it is moving and touching. Part history, part observation, it is written with a lightness and surety that is almost too beautiful for a travelogue. I picked it up for the subject, but I will be looking up other titles for Stewart's intelligent, stylish writing.

    • Lindsey says:

      I was amazed (and I think the author was too) at how the daily life of most modern Mongolians is so similar to life during the height of the Mongolian empire. Even in cities, the "suburbs" are still collections of gers and airaig is still the preferred alcoholic drink. This is a good companion book to read alongside Conn Iggulden's Conqueror series.

    • Alex Klaushofer says:

      So there I was, at a festival in Wales and it was raining so hard you couldn't even open the tent flap without getting soaked. And I didn't like the one book I had with me.Eventually I staggered through the mud to the campsite secondhand bookstall. And found this. A lifesaver. It rained all day, so I read all day. Great travel writing, and funny too.

    • Dlchambers says:

      The author sets out to retrace the path of Ghengis Khan, who, in the 12th century, conquered an empire that ranged from China to Moscow to Baghdad, and was on the verge of attacking Western Europe when he stopped and returned home. The book is a good read of travelling thru former Soviet states and the attempts by and results of both China and the USSR to dominate Mongolia

    • Christopher says:

      I am usually not a big fan of history merged with travelogue. It tends to great on me. I either want straight nature and/or ruins or straight history. But this one had both the self aware humor and the right timing to really leave a mark on me. I read it the month before I went off-straight after high school graduation-to spend a summer in Mongolia. It was good preparation.

    • Reid says:

      This author writes the most interesting sentences and paragraphs. I kept trying to grasp the form of the sentences to see why; and to see why they are often so funny, too.I love books like this that give ever-deepening insights into the life and culture of a people in a far away, remote land.

    • Ashley Memory says:

      This little gem made me want to go to Mongolia, which I had previously unfairly viewed as the most desolate place on earth. Not so! Can't say that I'd sip fermented mare's milk but everything else about this odyssey was strangely alluring and utterly unforgettable.

    • Elli says:

      Gorgeously written journey through the steppes of Mongolia. Hard to put down the book with its droll observations and dead pan humor. Beware of the horse with a man's name - is a prediction by a fortuneteller-librarian that really sticks and rather sadly comes true inevitably for the author.

    • Don Mcguire says:

      Just a great booklled with poignant detail & evocative prose. Funny. Magnificent landscapes populated by compelling & quirky characters. And he has a good nose for the historical import too!

    • Jonathan Cooley says:

      Entertaining and enlightening. travel writer with insight and humor

    • Heloise says:

      What a great read. This is my new favourite travel writer. Can't wait to lay my hands on his other books.

    • Ilsabe says:

      Really well written. Informative and interesting. And, what is impressive in travel writing, much more about the trip and the surroundings than about the author.

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