Traveling Light

Traveling Light Linda Pastan meditates on themes of aging and memory language and art in this moving collection where she travels from the Thanksgiving table a palimpsest with traces of the past showing through t

  • Title: Traveling Light
  • Author: Linda Pastan
  • ISBN: 9780393079074
  • Page: 172
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Linda Pastan meditates on themes of aging and memory, language and art in this moving collection, where she travels from the Thanksgiving table, a palimpsest with traces of the past showing through, to Japan, where she dreams in haiku Pastan expresses a full range of the possibilities and potencies of the human, feminine voice Boston Globe om In the ForLinda Pastan meditates on themes of aging and memory, language and art in this moving collection, where she travels from the Thanksgiving table, a palimpsest with traces of the past showing through, to Japan, where she dreams in haiku Pastan expresses a full range of the possibilities and potencies of the human, feminine voice Boston Globe om In the Forest The trees are litfrom within like Sabbath candlesbefore they are snuffed out.Autumn is such a Jewish season,the whole minor key of it.Hear how the wind trembles through the branches, vibratoas notes of cello music.
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      Published :2020-01-24T19:04:41+00:00

    617 Comment

    • Lisa Murray says:

      How can I rank this anything less than a 5 when my husband walks in the room and says "you're smiling, you must be reading that poetry again"? Section 3 (clocks) was by far my favorite with the longing to convert a dozen roses into aphrodisiacal beets, Q&A where a student asks if she knew Emily Dickinson, the Rothko quote "an involvement in light presupposes an acquaintance with shadow," and in Insomnia the image of sleep reluctant as a busy doctor giving me a little time.

    • Jsavett1 says:

      Pastan's newest collection is her strongest yet. If you've never read this Ruth Lilly Prize winning poet who served as Poet Laureate for the State of Maryland then this is the ideal place to start. The book is divided into five thematic sections, the strongest of which are " Years After The Garden, "Somewhere In The World," and "Traveling Light." One of the reasons I liked reading this collection in a week or so is that the poems really form a whole, each one a voice to the chorale of the book. [...]

    • Alarie says:

      Because she writes so clearly, I think Pastan’s a great poet to recommend to readers who usually avoid poetry, thinking poems too snooty and hard to understand. She’ll invite them into the poetry world and show them it’s really their world, too, with a spotlight turned on the small, often missed details. Like many books by aging poets, these poems are ticking away Pastan’s life, not in a morose way, but by focusing on appreciating the precious time left. She notices everything.The Garden [...]

    • Sarah Schantz says:

      This book of a poetry is a beautiful study of time, and all the many elements that involves, including everything from nostalgia to how the concept of the future can cause anxiety. It's strange because until I reached the very last poem with the same title as the book, I'd been thinking of the title as light traveling--as in light, the absence of dark, but then I read it in the context of the phrase: "Travel light," and I suppose, really, it's intended to be taken both ways. I just don't know ho [...]

    • Jean V. Naggar Literary says:

      “Traveling Light is elegantly humble, achieving lyricism through the skillful handling of plain speech[Pastan's] poetry gropes toward self-illumination, taking us with her so that we, her readers, are never in the same place at the end of a poem as we are at the beginning.” --Prairie Schooner“The poems in Traveling Light blend Pastan’s elegiac style with refreshing dashes of self-deprecating humor.” --The Washingtonian“To read a new book by Pastan is to know again the comfort of shar [...]

    • Johnny says:

      Linda Pastan is one of my favorite poets. The depth of her poems often turns on some witty self-deprecation, which is something that speaks fluently to my own neuroses. This collection of work focuses a lot on her age (nearly 80 at the time of publication), and yet there is a youthful playfulness to many of her poems. Her sardonic take on aging and is both hilarious and heart-breaking, and I found my noting more than a dozen pieces that I'd like to bring to my students!

    • Jason says:

      Pastan continues to deliver poems of power and grace. I devoured her book and will return to it. Some of my favorites include:BreadNoelTannenbaumInsomniaCounting BackwardsQ and AAshSilenceAnniversaryFlightThree Perfect DaysIn the Har-Poen Tea GardenEarlyTraveling LightOf the five sections in the book, I most enjoyed the third and fifth ones.

    • Gwyneth Stewart says:

      Linda Pastan's poems are always like pebbles dropped in clear water. You can see the stone, the ripples it makes, and the consequences that flow from there. Every poem is a perfect fusion of past and present, of what is and what might be.

    • Evie says:

      Very simplistic writing that manages to capture a complex image. Lovely poems and writing style.

    • Dayna says:

      Oh, my. I LOVE Pastan. This is the first book of hers that I've read, and it won't be the last. She has an Oliver-esque simplicity and clarity of image. She also ponders death quite a bit.

    • Beth Konkoski-Bates says:

      A lot of Adam and Eve imagery and much thinking about moments in later life. Love her imagery.

    • Carolyn says:

      Very good. I love it when poetry can be put in place. It captures the mood of location a bit better than most travel journals. Very good.

    • Carine Topal says:

      I was disappointed in the depth of the poems. I like Pastan's work, but these poems seemed weak, underwhelming.

    • Kat says:

      Thoughtful, delicate poems about seasons, travel, and aging.

    • Austen to Zafón says:

      I always enjoy Pastan's work. This one deals mostly with aging and death. Some beautiful work.

    • Crystal Rodriguez says:

      I gave two stars for the two poems I enjoyed out of this book. She had some great lines but nothing I could see as going deeper than I wished it had.

    • Elisabeth (Enthralled by the Written Word) says:

      Absolutely beautiful book of poems.

    • Trina Marie says:

      I am THAT heathen with the dog ears in this library book. So many goodies.

    • Christina Rau says:

      Traveling Light is one of the only collections of poetry that contains poems about nature that do not annoy me. Maybe Linda Pastan’s sectioning of poems helps create a larger picture into which these poems about birds and flowers fit that works for me. The blurb indicates that her work has been compared to Emily Dickinson, so I was more aware of that as I read; one of her own poems indicates the connection, so I guess I just accepted it was true. She has short lines for the most part, but the [...]

    • Anne says:

      A light touch applied to grave topics.

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