50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School: Real-world Antidotes to Feel-good Education

Rules Kids Won t Learn in School Real world Antidotes to Feel good Education Charles J Sykes offers fifty life lessons not included in the self esteem laden reality light curriculum of most schools Here are truths about what kids will encounter in the world post schooling an

  • Title: 50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School: Real-world Antidotes to Feel-good Education
  • Author: Charles J. Sykes
  • ISBN: 9780312360382
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Charles J Sykes offers fifty life lessons not included in the self esteem laden, reality light curriculum of most schools Here are truths about what kids will encounter in the world post schooling, and ideas for how parents can reclaim lost ground not with pep talks and touchy feely negotiations, but with honesty and respect Sykes s rules are frank, funny, and tough mCharles J Sykes offers fifty life lessons not included in the self esteem laden, reality light curriculum of most schools Here are truths about what kids will encounter in the world post schooling, and ideas for how parents can reclaim lost ground not with pep talks and touchy feely negotiations, but with honesty and respect Sykes s rules are frank, funny, and tough minded, including 1 Life is not fair Get used to it 7 If you think your teacher is tough, wait until you get a boss He doesn t have tenure, so he tends to be a bit edgier When you screw up, he s not going to ask you how you FEEL about it 15 Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity Your grandparents had a different word for burger flipping They called it opportunity 42 Change the oil 43 Don t let the success of others depress you 48 Tell yourself the story of your life Have a point.Each rule is explored with wise, pithy examples that parents, grandparents, and teachers can use to help children help themselves succeed in school and out of it.A few rules kids won t learn in school 9 Your school may have done away with winners and losers Life hasn t 14 Looking like a slut does not empower you 29 Learn to deal with hypocrisy 32 Television is not real life 38 Look people in the eye when you meet them 47 You are not perfect, and you don t have to be 50 Enjoy this while you can.
    • [PDF] Download ✓ 50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School: Real-world Antidotes to Feel-good Education | by Õ Charles J. Sykes
      226 Charles J. Sykes
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ 50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School: Real-world Antidotes to Feel-good Education | by Õ Charles J. Sykes
      Posted by:Charles J. Sykes
      Published :2020-02-18T00:02:16+00:00

    749 Comment

    • Ken says:

      Bill Gates gave a speech to a high school in Texas I believe, and discussed several of these rules for which he has been attributed. However after some research I found the correct author and bought the book. Of all the books I have ever read this book struck so much more than a cord. I found myself nodding smiling and laughing out loud as I agreed with virtually everything Sykes was saying.Many of the lessons that used to be learned in our journey through education and the early part of our liv [...]

    • David Michael says:

      The author doesn't like "kids today", the internet, or any decade since the 1950's.I read this book expecting snarky and fun. Instead, all I got were banal stories and curmudgeonly regurgitations.

    • Vex says:

      It started out ok, but turned into too much 'old white man' ranting for my taste. Which doesn't change the validity of the rules themselves, it just left a bad aftertaste.

    • James Carter says:

      50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School is a harsh reading although it's mostly true. I think I was more bothered by the number of logical fallacies committed when the author compared the kids' "woe is me" situation with really serious international incidents. Hence, it's uncalled for. Initially, I was confused who the intended audience was, and then, I decided that the author was speaking to entitled and/or wealthy kids. In my opinion, having worked with these students as a teacher, I think it's a [...]

    • Mark Steed says:

      This book was the original inspiration of the 11 things that Young People don 19t learn in school, but need to know about life that went viral purporting to be a speech to High School leavers by Bill Gates.Sykes has a clear agenda: he believes that the American education system and parents are letting children down because they are not preparing them for the realities of adult life. He hopes the book will be "an antidote to our culture of complacency and indulgence" (p.4).He is highly critical o [...]

    • Keegan says:

      In this 50 chapter exposition book, Charlie Sykes shares with you what kids of today don't have and what they need to get ready for life. These "rules" are an observation of the low expectation, feel-good education, and the attitude of self entitlement young Americans. Sykes does a great job of pulling together quotes, news stories, and statistics to really show that our trends are not the right path. He criticizes schools and parents for ignoring the issues of our teens today, " A culture has t [...]

    • Misha Hamu says:

      This book went past snarky and into just plain meanspirited.The point of it could have been summarized in one sentence- no need for fifty rules. Not to mention the entire premise is flawed. There's a ton of complaints about how 'kids these days' (whatever that means) just don't understand hard work, but there's no substantiation of that claim. There is certainly no acknowledgement that literacy the world over has steadily increased. There's nothing addressing the actual issue of our education sy [...]

    • Adam Floridia says:

      Every student should read this book. Every parent should read this book. Hell, everyone should read this book.Although Sykes at times contradicts himself, offers questionable data, and uses some fallacious arguments, his overall assessment of the sad state of "kids these days" could not be more accurate. Every teacher who reads this will undoubtedly think (multiple times), "How true! I witnessed that very same appalling behavior (multiple times) today!" From the unwarranted sense of entitlement [...]

    • Terrie says:

      Sykes really hit the nail on the head with this one. Also called "The wimpification of childhood." His rules include topics about the lack of responsibility, education (he blames the teachers a bit too much for me here), blaming, and sending a whole generation into the world unprepared with reality. My favorite chapter was #15- "Flipping hamburgers is not beneath your dignity. Your grandparents had a different word for burger flipping. They called it opportunity." He explains all the things you [...]

    • Michael says:

      Some really good rules; (#1 Life is not fair, get used to it. #9 Your school may have done away with winners and losers. Life hasn't; #38 Look people in the eye when you meet them #49 Don't forget to say Thank You), and some rather mundane; (#6 No, you cannot be everything you dream; #37 Being connected does not mean you aren't clueless.) The author clearly wrote this for his daughter, but anyone, any age, will glean some pearls of wisdom from this list. Interesting read. And I this is to the tw [...]

    • Daisy says:

      I loved this book. Even though it was suppose to be like a informative book, some of the things the people did where just plan stupid you had to laugh. I also liked most of the chapter titles! Here are some of my Favorate chapter names,1. Life is not Fair. Get used to it2. Your navel is not that interesting. Don't spend your life gazing at it3. Be nice to nerds. You may end up working for them. We all could4. If you think your teacher tough, wait until you get a boss. He won't have tenure, so he [...]

    • Kathy says:

      This should be required reading for every parent, teacher, and student. If kids got a big dose of reality, such as delivered by Mr. Sykes, then maybe we wouldn't be so far behind compared to our counterparts. And for the record, I'm a public school teacher have been for ten years.My favorite rules? #19. It's not your parents' fault. If you screw up, you are responsible; and #21. You're offended? So what? No, really. So what?

    • Chelsey Uhrig says:

      I really enjoyed this book at first. The rules are all truth. As an educator I see first hand what has become of our nation's youth. Despite its truth, after a while I began to feel like the book was nothing but a rant [emphasis added]. I didn't appreciate the finger pointing at the education system. Some educators care, and try to impart these lessons. The ones who care point the finger at the parents, so I guess that makes us no better than this author with his rants.

    • Heidi says:

      I'd like to read this book (or go over the basic idea of each point) with each of my kids before they are teenagers and entering High School, maybe even Middle School/Junior High, whatever they call it here. The great thing about this book is each rule could probably be backed up by a General Conference talk. (I guess that should be the other way around. This guy just presents it in a more in your face kind of way.) Life isn't fair, get over it.

    • Saralyn says:

      I recommend this book to just about anyone. In fact, I think a lot of people really need to read it. The author brings up a lot of really good points. Although I can't say I agree with every sentence he said, I really appreciated the points he brought up and the real-world examples he illustrated them with. A quick and entertaining and thought-provoking read. I loved it!

    • Stacey says:

      I really enjoyed this book. I randomly picked it up from the library one day when I was in the mood for a self-help book. I found this one very entertaining and all so true. I plan on reading this book with my children once they are a bit older. I think all children would benefit from this book and it's "rules."

    • Sherri Dishon says:

      It softens up towards the end of the book but it's pretty harsh on some levels. It's meant for an audience that is self-absorbed, spoiled, and bratty which is ironic because I don't think those people would be ready or willing to read this type of book; but it is good advice. Just didn't do me a lot of good since I've been taught these lessons already from my parents.

    • Jenny Dombroski says:

      This book was recommended to me by my parents, and at first I was a little skeptical of the amount of sarcasm used by the author. But despite its somewhat cynical comments, I actually found that this easy-read encouraged me to be responsible for my own future and demeanor. A much needed commentary on our societal ills and a must-read for any new parent or new teenager :).

    • Tracey says:

      This book points out a lot of things to think about. HOWEVER, why is it that school is the only place children are to learn. My own children learn a lot OUTSIDE of school. We talk about how life isn't fair, we don't get rewarded for everything we do, etc.So, while I like a lot about what the book states, I also feel that kids can learn a lot away from school and that is OK!

    • Jessica says:

      My kids are still too young for most of this book to be applied but I view it as a how-to-raise-worth-while-kids manual for raising kids in this world of participation trophies and mediocrity celebrations.

    • Brian Weisz says:

      Humorous, but also sarcastic and biting. What more could you want in a book?We read this book to the kids at the breakfast table before they went to school. They said it was boring, of course, but I know a lot of it sunk in. It really is the kind of stuff you won't learn in school.

    • Ietrio says:

      A preacher for the old saying 'spare the rod, spoil the child.' These are not even rules. There are a series of NO that the author feels should be branded well into the minds and bodies of the future generations. Disgusting.

    • Nick says:

      Yeah, well, hard to disagree with any of this and I'm left simply wondering who the intended audience is. I would recommend it as family reading for parents and 12 year olds. Very sound advice for those who need it.

    • Katy says:

      This is an easy read full of common sense advice aimed at older teens/young adults. I found it a little heavy-handed at times, but mostly appropriate. I'm not familiar with any of the author's other writings, but it left me with the impression he is none to fond of our current education system.

    • Gordonclan5 says:

      This book shows one author's perspective on "feel good" education. I found it to be, at times, humorous in the explanations. I am a bit saddened at how the public education system has taken so much away from real education.

    • Carla says:

      The book is dated, but still a good read. It pushed some of my buttons, confirmed some of my beliefs, challenged me a little and made me laugh. Not bad for an afternoon.

    • Miray şahin says:

      now i think i know whY they needs migrant brains

    • Cristian Marrero says:

      As a teacher, I loved this book. So true, factual and up to date in 2016!

    • Jin Shusong says:

      Every girl should read this book.

    • Holly Jorgenson says:

      Completely sad, but true.

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