The Boston Stranglers

The Boston Stranglers The Boston Stranglers

  • Title: The Boston Stranglers
  • Author: Susan Kelly
  • ISBN: 9780786014668
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The Boston Stranglers
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      429 Susan Kelly
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      Posted by:Susan Kelly
      Published :2019-09-09T06:39:37+00:00

    245 Comment

    • Jim says:

      Maybe it's just me but I didn't (couldn't) finish this book. It was so long and convoluted that I had trouble following it. Normally, I like true crime stories, however, I could not get into this one. There were so many characters (cops, DA's, AG, Deputy AG, attorneys, et al) that I had a problem keeping up with them. I can understand why all the people involved because there were 11 victims. As I understand the book, it questions whether Albert DeSalvo was the actual Boston Strangler.

    • Susan says:

      As one who once lived in Boston's Back Bay, I have always been fascinated by the Boston Strangler murders (1962-1964). Susan Kelly has written what I consider to be the definitive book about them.Albert DeSalvo confessed to the murders in November 1964 while incarcerated in Bridgewater Hospital for a mental evaluation related to other crimes. F. Lee Bailey, never one to dodge the spotlight, claimed Albert as his client, negotiated with officials to get Albert immunity and taped his confession. K [...]

    • Anina says:

      The literary equivalent of watching a bunch of episodes of CSI all in a row because you are at your parents house and there's nothing better to do and why do they even have this book? This is not well written but there are 75 chapters and each are three pages long each so you might as well read one more!

    • Jamie says:

      I enjoyed reading this book. After reading this book which is the second book I've read about the Boston Strangler, that Albert was never the Strangler and the true Strangler was the one that gave Albert the information to use in his confessions hoping to draw attention away from himself and also hoping maybe to get the reward money for saying Albert was the Strangler. Albert needed help for his problems that put him in prison,he didn't need prison he needed a State Hospital with a specialist to [...]

    • Melinda Elizabeth says:

      After listening to the podcast 'stranglers' where this book is referred to quite often, I thought I should go directly to the source for more information. The book covers a large amount of ground, but is probably missing in regards to the victims themselves. They are referenced shortly through the summation of the crimes, but then left for 'further reading' towards the end of the novel. Instead, the book deep dives into Albert DeSalvo, the court cases and his popular attorney F.Lee, and the furo [...]

    • Pete says:

      This was a very interesting and well presented account of the murders attributed to the Boston strangler. The real story though dealt with the shameful conduct of the Massachusetts's politicians, lawyers and media that tried to use Albert DeSalvo as a pawn to advance their own careers. In that respect this incident was very much like the one that saw Bruno Hauptman railroaded for the kidnapping of the Lindberg infant.

    • Susan says:

      Long and hard to get into. I listened to the first 6 parts and had to give up. The book started out good, but was hard to follow after a while.

    • Y says:

      Dull and slow. Includes a LOT of details, though unfortunately many of which I doubt most people really care about. For every few segments of genuinely interesting facts, we're then punished with a slew of horribly boring ones. I'm currently on a now two-week break from the book, having had to call it temporary quits from the never-ending excerpts of some of De Salvo's "confessions". There is very little value in the amount from the transcripts the author decided to republish; a few paragraphs w [...]

    • Fishface says:

      Wow! The author explains that Gerold Frank wrote "The Boston Strangler" based on the story he bought from Albert DeSalvo -- and by the way, he never paid him for it. While the book bogs down at the place where she goes JUST ABOUT ENDLESSLY into the unethical business maneuverings of F. Lee Bailey, the rest of the book was really a page-turner. Based on interviews with nearly everyone involved in the Strangler investigation, including relatives of the victims and DeSalvo, we find out who the real [...]

    • John Hardin says:

      Blows the lid off the conventional thinking about the famous Boston Strangler case. The author lays out the evidence that Albert DeSalvo could not have been the killer and that his confession was bogus. Susan Kelly provides proof that the murders were not committed by DeSalvo, but were actually a group of unrelated copycat crimes. She even names suspects, some of whom bragged to DeSalvo in jail about what they did.I would give this book 5 stars, but the middle bogged me down so much that I skimm [...]

    • Mel says:

      I found this book an interesting read. It is not for someone looking for a quick read as it is packed with details of the investigation. As well, numerous victims, suspects, lawyers, law enforcement officials, family members and others involved are constantly being introduced and profiled. You have to stay on your toes if you want to keep them all straight!

    • Myles David says:

      Again, focusing on the Boston Strangler for my own documentary project, Susan Kelly lays out the case of the Boston Strangler in new light, sometimes pushing a little heavy, but really doing an impressive in depth of job of examining this twisted case. Her own research of the politicking that went on is interesting. It is a long read and there is a lot of info in the book.

    • Elise says:

      I was really excited to start reading it but when I started it was like, no ending. There were so many characters and I could not keep up with all of them. And they had "evidence" but at the end it's just like ummmm

    • Jane says:

      I'm pretty fascinated by the Boston Strangler case and I thought this was just boring. The information is really interesting - it could have been presented in a much better way, though. I couldn't even finish it.

    • Stacey Ogilvie says:

      I didn't know much about the topic before the book. It didn't go into details of the murders just the confessions and possibility of potential suspects. Some parts drawn out Some very interesting

    • Michelle says:

      It could not keep my interest so I stopped reading it.

    • Eshel Quezada says:

      Each and every event and every detail is terrible, grisly killing that you almost cannot imagine, whether a human or a demon created the murder.

    • Elizabeth Atwood says:

      The Boston Police and really everyone involved did a horrible job investigating an alarming number of murders. But they were women, so who cares right?

    • Brooke says:

      Got this book in mp3 format, couldn't listen to it and keep up.

    • Crys says:

      Awful writing. Boring and monotonous.

    • Tom Mueller says:

      Subsequent writings cast doubt on the guilt of Albert DeSalvo, often pointing to George Nassar, convicted two time murderer and a client of F. Lee Bailey who introduced Bailey to DeSalvo.

    • Susan says:

      Repetitive, didn't like the chronology as presented.

    • Tom Mueller says:

      Public officials believe there were multiple murderers involved, DeSalvo not guilty – too many inconsistencies in his ‘confession’.

    • Elaine says:

      The story of many killers responsible for the murders in and around Boston , not Albert DeSalvo as put forth by F. Lee Bailey. Convincing, researched.

    • John Jackson says:

      I knew far too little about the Boston Strangler, and now I firmly believe that we all do. DeSalvo didn't act aloneybe not at all.

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