This Will Change Everything: Ideas That Will Shape the Future

This Will Change Everything Ideas That Will Shape the Future This Will Change Everything offers seemingly radical but actually feasible ideas with the potential to change the world Jared Diamond Pulitzer Prize winning author of Guns Germs and SteelEditor Joh

  • Title: This Will Change Everything: Ideas That Will Shape the Future
  • Author: John Brockman
  • ISBN: 9780061899676
  • Page: 103
  • Format: Paperback
  • This Will Change Everything offers seemingly radical but actually feasible ideas with the potential to change the world Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Guns, Germs, and SteelEditor John Brockman continues in the same vein as his popular compilations What Are You Optimistic About and What Have You Changed Your Mind About with This Will Change Everything This Will Change Everything offers seemingly radical but actually feasible ideas with the potential to change the world Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Guns, Germs, and SteelEditor John Brockman continues in the same vein as his popular compilations What Are You Optimistic About and What Have You Changed Your Mind About with This Will Change Everything Brockman asks 150 intellectual superstars what game changing scientific ideas and developments do you expect to live to see Their fascinating responses are collected here, from bestselling author of Atonement Ian McEwan to Nobel Prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek to electronic music pioneer Brian Eno to writer, actor, director, and activist Alan Alda.
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      Published :2020-01-22T18:36:35+00:00

    267 Comment

    • Daniel Solera says:

      I bought this book thinking it would be a series of ten to twenty essays, each focusing on one particular product or concept and how its contribution to society will be magnified by future technological advancements. I was right about most of that guess - I was wrong about the number of authors. Not ten or twenty, but one hundred and twenty five scholars lend their voice to this compilation, each expounding on one or many changes they believe will happen in the coming decades that will, as the t [...]

    • Ophelia3339 says:

      This particular book contains a bunch of artists and scientists doing a lot of lofty predicting. Not that I'm against high altitude thinking I guess I more concerned with the practical things. When will dinner be ready is what I'm hearing most not when will AI make it possible to solve the world's problems. Some things can be done but I wonder if some things should be done. Who exactly is going to carry out the practical aspects of advanced technology? Who are the boots on the ground?

    • Kerry says:

      This is a book that I would recommend without hesitation. Imagine the opportunity in 1641 to ask Galileo--what in your opinion would change everything. Or in 1687 to ask Newton what will change everything? This book poses the question to a range of recognized contemporary individuals--what in your mind will change everything. The book is quite accessible because the posts contained here are submitted with a mind to brevity. And while the editing seems to sequence articles to their subject matter [...]

    • Dr. Carl Ludwig Dorsch says:

      An orange, puffed cheese flavored product.“Nobody ever voted for printing. Nobody ever voted for electricity. Nobody ever voted for radio, the telephone, the automobile, the airplane, television. Nobody ever voted for penicillin, antibiotics, the Pill. Nobody ever voted for space travel, massively parallel computing, nuclear power, the personal computer, the Internet, email, cell phones, the Web, Google, cloning, sequencing the entire human genome.” That from the preface; would that the volu [...]

    • Nathan says:

      I would not recommend reading this book in a week. The numerous brief essays are much more suited for a "one-per-day" approach, giving the reader (at least this one) time to appreciate the material presented.I enjoyed many of the essays and the broad range of topics covered. Overall, I came away with a feeling that they were too frequent and too brief. However, I will be digging deeper into the works of several authors.In the end, I would recommend this collection and have specific plans to so. [...]

    • Dltharp says:

      Good views from a variety of thinkers. There is a reference to a website edge that has more of a collection of questions that are answered by lots of smart people and other books like this one.

    • Jera says:

      the juan enrique and max tegmark ones spoke to me the most.

    • Bjarne Siewertsen says:

      An interesting book - but also too long. I left wiser than I arrive.

    • Paulius says:

      Knyga susideda iš klausimo “Kas pakeis viską?” ir gausybės atsakymų į jį. Dalis jų yra įdomūs, įžvalgūs ir priverčiantys pamąstyti, pvz. atsakymai gauti iš: Richard Dawkins, Corey S. Powell, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Dimitar Sasselov, Geroge Dyson, Freeman Dyson, Haim Harari, Keith Devlin, A. Garrett Lisi, Austin Dacey, David Berreby, Carlo Rovelli. Kai Krause.Gaila, tačiau likusios idėjos yra arba savaime suprantamos bei pasikartojančios arba elementarus papilstymas iš tuš [...]

    • Chris says:

      (Accidentally left on an airplane, had to buy a new copy, took a bit longer to finish)Good stuff. Whereas Brockman's "Science At The Edge" had maybe a dozen or two longer, more in-depth essays, this work was a tapas menu of 1-5 page essays, all bite-sized, on what various Edge members thought would change everything. It was certainly slanted to what scientific/technological breakthrough would do that, but some writers found some more esoteric/creative ideas to introduce. There were several usual [...]

    • Carrie says:

      So I checked this out of the library and only had time to get through a few of the essays. What seemed to be said in more than one (and an idea I've been coming across in different places) is that we as humans are going to have to change our way of thinking about humanity. Given that cloning, gene manipulation, and part-human/part-animal and part-human/part-machine combos are happening now, we should probably start loosening up on our definition of humanity and expand our ethics to include anima [...]

    • Ondrej Sykora says:

      I'm still somewhere in the first quarter and I'm not going to return to this book.Each time, I picked it up I read an essay or two, but somehow, I can't make myself read more of them. When buying, I've expected something more coherent, not a collection of short essays. But they're probably not even essays. Each "chapter" is only a few pages long, so they are very shallow and usually there's nothing to think about, no interesting arguments to support it, many of them does not try to view the prob [...]

    • Hrvoje says:

      Knjiga brojnim znanstvenicima/tehnolozima postavlja jedno jednostavno pitanje: "Što će promijeniti sve u budućnosti?". Ideja je sjajna,postaviti nekim od najvećih umova današnjice isto pitanje i gledati njihove odgovore. Moj problem s ovom knjigom leži u tome što je jednostavno previše osoba odgovaralo na pitanje (njih oko 130), tako da je svatko dobio po max. 3 stranice da se izrazi što je u svakom slučaju nedovoljno, kada bi broj smanjili na 30 ljudi koji mogu detaljnije razviti svoj [...]

    • Dena Burnett says:

      Enjoyable "convenient" read. It's set up in a series of some short, some a little longer essay-type readings; making it easy for busy people like myself who may only have 5-10 minutes to sit down and read something thoughtful, but quick. Some essays are worth reading, discussing, and thinking about; others, although well-written, seem like the ideas were simply thrown together, making your mind leap to some pretty out-there ideas. I recommend it for busy people who still want to indulge in a lit [...]

    • Nicola says:

      Quite literally one of the best books I've read. I am alternately thrilled and optimistic, and glum and despairing, when I think about all the astonishingly clever ideas put forward in TWCEverything. One thing is certain from it I will glean many more authors whose work to pursue and likely a bad case of RSI from many, many internet searches to find out if any of the ideas suggested in 2009 have been realised in the intervening eight years.

    • John Baker says:

      This is such a great collection of essays and such a great idea for a collection it is hard to start.Simply going out to such a list of scientists, thinkers, artists and business people with the simple question "what would change everything?" is smart. Keeping the answers short is smarter. Being able to then group them by discipline since people do like to talk about what they know makes it really work. I like being able to snack on ideas when you need some intellectual inspiration.

    • Vicky says:

      Here is a very interesting book, the collection of short essays by the prominent scientists, who contemplate the future of humanity. At the end the some of the possible scenarios for the future made me really depressed. There are so many ways that we can destroy ourselves, the planet, the climate, our biology that the optimistic outcomes are pale in comparison. Regardless the pessimism, the book is full of amazing ideas and opens wide horizons into the possible futures

    • Adrienna says:

      As I started reading this book, first few contributing writers and pieces were focused on "evolution" which abruptly and adamantly disagree with this philosophy of humanity.I skimmed through the book until I came to a section "talents" on page 160-161. There were a few interesting pieces but not what I bargained to read or accidentally picked up this copy at my local library.

    • Lindsay Goto says:

      It's a fascinating collection of short essays on the future of humanity, grouped by what people think will be the next invention which will change our future irrevocably. Despite the dim projections of some of its writers, there is also a lot of hope bundled up in one book. It was an interesting read to be sure.

    • Dmitriy Nikitin says:

      Having read the book, the third biggest predictions of what will change the word are computers, genetics, and aliens. I was particularly disappointed in several of the contributions that were a sentence long, I'm looking at you, Gerald Holton. All in all, an interesting book that's worth skimming over, seeing as how many of the contributions are repetitive.

    • Brian says:

      Good thoughts from the famous.

    • Daahoud Asante says:

      interesting booki have all the Brockman books, highly recommend them all.

    • Ken says:

      a good sampling of ideas out there. Average entry length of a bout 2-3 pg, good intro to an idea but limited in details. Recommended for "ideas" junkie or writers looking for ideas.

    • BrendanMcAuliffe says:

      Very helpful ( now have to read ten more books however )

    • Jesse says:

      Love the series, am not particularly impressed with the book.

    • Mark says:

      If you read the chapter on so-called post-rational economics, you will know all you need to about what a turd this book is.

    • Corey says:

      This book is pretty insightful. A pretty interesting read.

    • Cyrus says:

      There are over 100 essays in this book and many of them are very similar. The editor could have easily whittled that number down to the 40-50 most original predictions.

    • Knemlich says:

      Want to learn about cutting-edge science and what it might yield in the future? This is the place to start. These writers bring science to life for any reader.

    • David Cooper says:

      A fun book to take with you - a collection of short essays by some great minds. Easy to read a few pages at a time and pick up later on.

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