Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism

Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism Erwin Panofksy was one of the great scholars of the twentieth century Panofsky modestly described his second annual Wimmer Lecture at Saint Vincent College as another diffident attempt at correlating

  • Title: Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism
  • Author: Erwin Panofsky
  • ISBN: 9780970821652
  • Page: 175
  • Format: Paperback
  • Erwin Panofksy was one of the great scholars of the twentieth century Panofsky modestly described his second annual Wimmer Lecture at Saint Vincent College as another diffident attempt at correlating Gothic architecture and scholasticism, but it has remained in print in numerous languages for than half a century His lecture stands as a brilliant man s tribute to tErwin Panofksy was one of the great scholars of the twentieth century Panofsky modestly described his second annual Wimmer Lecture at Saint Vincent College as another diffident attempt at correlating Gothic architecture and scholasticism, but it has remained in print in numerous languages for than half a century His lecture stands as a brilliant man s tribute to the legacy of Christian humanism.
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      Published :2020-01-11T19:05:05+00:00

    401 Comment

    • Andrew says:

      Author attempts to show connection between High Gothic architecture and High ism. Most Gothic architects trained in the same area within one hundred miles of Paris and therefore were trained in similar ways and had run-ins with the scholastic thinkers who also thrived in this area. Looking at architecture from Early, High (roughly 1200-1250 AD), and Late Gothic periods, the author finds several points where the architecture parallels thought, especially during the High period. This is mainly il [...]

    • Craig W. says:

      In any age ideas consciously or more often unconsciously give shape to the tangible products of society. Edwin Panofsky discusses how characteristic ideas of theology and philosophy of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries manifest themselves in Gothic architecture. He asserts that the relationship between theology and architecture is not merely a parallel development nor the specific influence of key individuals but a general and diffuse influenceHigh ism sought to demonstrate the unity of trut [...]

    • Jessica says:

      So I decided that it would be culturally irresponsible of me not to take advantage of a course offered this semester in which we will spend the bulk of the semester reading The Divine Comedy. And thus the Gothic.I have to give props to Panofsky for being slightly funny he called some scholars "ignoramuses," I laughed. I also have to say that he was clear enough so that a Gothic ignoramus such as myself was actually able to decipher the meaning of ism and Gothic.I wish I had known some of this ba [...]

    • Don says:

      An exploration of similar themes in two contemporaneous disciplines. Found it in the Ireland Library on the campus of St. Thomas University in Saint Paul, MN. Read it for a project in a Medieval Art class.

    • Moses Operandi says:

      Panofsky's thesis about a causal connection between Gothic architecture and scholastic thought is fascinating, but I find it difficult to reach his level of certainty. He's out on the skinny branches.

    • ehk2 says:

      origins of Bourdieu's 'habitus'

    • Patrick\ says:

      To know Gothic is to add this little work to your vaulted interior brain.

    • Tina says:

      "It is surely rather fanciful" ruthsdesignblogles.wordpre

    • TaleofGenji says:

      I registered a book at BookCrossing!BookCrossing/journal/11137703

    • Monica says:

      I don't know if the book touches on it but it's interesting to think that for a country that denounced Catholicism England embraced such a religious style in it's buildings.

    • Steve says:

      Enjoyable and interesting in it's own way. Panofsky maps out Gothic architecture against medieval theology.

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