The Shock of the Anthropocene: The Earth, History and Us

The Shock of the Anthropocene The Earth History and Us Dissecting the new theoretical buzzword of the Anthropocene The Earth has entered a new epoch the Anthropocene What we are facing is not only an environmental crisis but a geological revolution of hu

  • Title: The Shock of the Anthropocene: The Earth, History and Us
  • Author: Christophe Bonneuil Jean-Baptiste Fressoz David Fernbach
  • ISBN: 9781784780814
  • Page: 475
  • Format: ebook
  • Dissecting the new theoretical buzzword of the Anthropocene The Earth has entered a new epoch the Anthropocene What we are facing is not only an environmental crisis, but a geological revolution of human origin In two centuries, our planet has tipped into a state unknown for millions of years.How did we get to this point Refuting the convenient view of a human specieDissecting the new theoretical buzzword of the Anthropocene The Earth has entered a new epoch the Anthropocene What we are facing is not only an environmental crisis, but a geological revolution of human origin In two centuries, our planet has tipped into a state unknown for millions of years.How did we get to this point Refuting the convenient view of a human species that upset the Earth system, unaware of what it was doing, this book proposes the first critical history of the Anthropocene, shaking up many accepted ideas about our supposedly recent environmental awareness, about previous challenges to industrialism, about the manufacture of ignorance and consumerism, about so called energy transitions, as well as about the role of the military in environmental destruction In a dialogue between science and history, The Shock of the Anthropocene dissects a new theoretical buzzword and explores paths for living and acting politically in this rapidly developing geological epoch.
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      475 Christophe Bonneuil Jean-Baptiste Fressoz David Fernbach
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      Posted by:Christophe Bonneuil Jean-Baptiste Fressoz David Fernbach
      Published :2019-02-16T12:03:26+00:00

    315 Comment

    • Anna says:

      It took me some while to get into ‘The Shock of the Anthropocene’ because, not to put too fine a point on it, this book is a total fucking downer. Even if, like me, you have read the same summary of climate science many times and research its policy implications as your day job, this is a particularly heavy duty depressing version. Bonneuil and Fressoz thoroughly illuminate the concept of the ‘anthropocene’ - the idea that human activity has altered the climate sufficiently to end the Ho [...]

    • Jonathan says:

      A well-argued and thorough critique of the use of the term "Anthropocene," which--arising from the geology community--has become quite popular in environmental circles in recent years. As Bonneuil and Fressoz argue, the term "Anthropocene" can risk obscuring more than it reveals by speaking of a universal, generalized "humanity" and by ignoring the long history of human impact on (and degradation of) ecosystems. We cannot understand the present (or how we got there) nor determine how to act in t [...]

    • philosovamp says:

      Bonneuil and Fressoz breakdown the "Anthropocene" concept and modern environmentalism as a whole. They do not dispute that the Earth's climate is changing because of human actions in a drastic and non-linear fashion, but they do think the prevailing expressions of the "Anthropocene" are illusory. This is a historiographical move you're likely familiar with, and they show that: environmentalism is not at all a modern movement, and that people (both for and against progress they know is damaging) [...]

    • Ron Pratt says:

      An important dissection of a hot-button word, this book challenges us to alter our preconceptions about our place in nature -- and our current negative impact on the planet. Part exploration of how we got here, part suggestions on how to go forward in a more earth-centric way, one that will make our future survival more likely. Academic and topical, and for that reason quite readable.

    • Leif says:

      A remarkable duo of historians produce an elegant, fast-paced, and methodical collection of historical sketches to contextualize our age: the Anthropocene. Read. Read again.

    • Nigel says:

      An excellent synthesis of works from many fields that must mentally and strategically adjust to the recent certification by geologists of a new epoch in the history of the earth; the Anthropocene; the age of indisputable human impact upon the planet, in geologic and atmospheric senses. The authors bring together a broad range of sources from environmental, economic, political social history (and that least fashionable thing, plain old straight historical history) to bear on the question; what do [...]

    • Peter Harrison says:

      A polemic on climate change and the impact of humanity on the earth. Very wide ranging in its scope running through the history of those who have challenged the climatic impact of industrialisation from before the industrial revolution, as well as the basic science behind the description of a new geological era where humanity dominates the globe - the "anthropocene".The very sweep and scope of this book means that the treatment of is sometimes quite brief. It would benefit for example from a mor [...]

    • Vishal Misra says:

      This is a simply breathtaking history. Powerfully argued, compulsively readable, informative and a much needed critical insight into what being human means - and what it means for the planet.Part one lays out the framework for what the anthropocene means. The hard data that geologists have analyses to conclude that we are firmly in the grips of the anthropocene. Part two is where the book gets very interesting indeed. Laying bare the lie that we have sleepwalked in to this new geological age. In [...]

    • Quentin says:

      You don't need a PhD to read this, but it would help. For the concerned but uneducated reader, it is heavy enough to make Proust look like Seuss, and it took about 200 pages of hard work to finally feel like I'd got into it. Once I did, it was a fascinating and informative read, outstandingly well researched, and thoughtful in its presentation and discussion. Essentially it breaks down the climate mess we find ourselves in, by looking in turn at every major aspect that has led us to make the dec [...]

    • Paisley Green says:

      A very impressive historiographical work compiling many different perspectives on the Anthropocene. The text can be a bit dry at times, but what it might lack in momentum it makes up for in sheer amounts of compiled information.

    • David Biello says:

      ShockedRead this for the most astute and concise politicaltake on our new unnatural world. Broad and provocative on the challenge ahead of us, nothing less than true emancipation.

    • Stacey Balkan says:

      The most satisfying environmental history since Cronon's 'Nature's Metropolis'! Its erudition is unmatched--a thorough scrutiny of the Anthropocene's many proposed histories form the Thermocene to the Capitalocene.

    • Ellie Botoman says:

      at times a bit dense, but a necessary read nonetheless

    • Robert says:

      A much needed book that uncover the history and politics behind the Anthropocene.

    • Cecilia Zhang says:

      The book has many brilliant arguments and I also agree with the authors' concerns and share with them the same anxiety about current humanity. But one danger of this book is that by bringing up Anthropocene as a grand historical narrative, and a new approach of humanity, the authors might show too much confidence and put too much effort into Anthropocene. Overall, the authors make Anthropocene a panacea to not only the anthrocentric humanity, but also the current crisis of democracy and capitali [...]

    • Alma says:

      Humans have been altering the earth systems since they first appeared, but the scale and corresponding impact of their alterations reaches unprecedented levels in the last 250 years. During those 250 year, we have changed the planet sufficiently to become a geological, in addition to being biological, force, precipitating a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. This outstanding book discusses the genesis of Anthropocene and the defining role of industrial capitalism and colonialism in accelera [...]

    • Eileen Hall says:

      I'm not sure I understand the reasoning in this book.I hadn't heard the word before!I will reread and try again.I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Verso Books (U S ) via in return for an honest unbiased review.

    • Mia says:

      I’ve been slowly reading “The shock of the Anthropocene” by Bonneuil & Fressoz, and finally I finished. It’s a very good book on the subject, with some of the best documentation I’ve read and the most complex, courageously critical views. It’s very good to check after you already know a bit about the subject, and not before - only then you realize what it brings new, what it summarizes better, and what it stands against. For example, one of its main arguments is that this “ecol [...]

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