The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of France

The Perfect Meal In Search of the Lost Tastes of France John Baxter s The Perfect Meal is part grand tour of France part history of French cuisine taking readers on a journey to discover and savor some of the world s great cultural achievements before th

  • Title: The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of France
  • Author: John Baxter
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • John Baxter s The Perfect Meal is part grand tour of France, part history of French cuisine, taking readers on a journey to discover and savor some of the world s great cultural achievements before they disappear completely.Some of the most revered and complex elements of French cuisine are in danger of disappearing as old ways of agriculture, butchering, and cooking fadeJohn Baxter s The Perfect Meal is part grand tour of France, part history of French cuisine, taking readers on a journey to discover and savor some of the world s great cultural achievements before they disappear completely.Some of the most revered and complex elements of French cuisine are in danger of disappearing as old ways of agriculture, butchering, and cooking fade and are forgotten In this charming culinary travel memoir, John Baxter follows up his bestselling The Most Beautiful Walk in the World by taking his readers on the hunt for some of the most delicious and bizarre endangered foods of France.The Perfect Meal In Search of the Lost Tastes of France is the perfect read for foodies and Francophiles, cooks and gastronomists, and fans of food culture.
    • [PDF] ¼ Free Read Ü The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of France : by John Baxter ✓
      411 John Baxter
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ¼ Free Read Ü The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of France : by John Baxter ✓
      Posted by:John Baxter
      Published :2019-04-24T14:33:18+00:00

    792 Comment

    • Marita says:

      Australian author John Baxter lives in France with his French wife, Marie-Dominique. Having taken a friend out to dinner where the meal turned out to be more decoration than substance, (““Not that the food wasn’t good . . .” And it had been good. Just a bit . . . well, precious.”) John decided to create the perfect banquet menu composed of traditional French food. Do these traditions in fact still exist? His quest takes him all around the country, and as he travels and eats he shares h [...]

    • Purlewe says:

      As a lover of both food books and travel books this was right up my alley. I appreciated the thoroughness in which he studied the cuisines from the past and tried to find them in the present day. I loved reading about how food we eat today got that way and why. Made me want to go traipsing about France again.

    • Jane Hoppe says:

      In The Perfect Meal, John Baxter recounts some of his France memories as he imagines a feast celebrating the most iconic French foods. And he travels to locales best known for the dishes he wishes to serve in his imaginary repas. The premise of the book allows Baxter to be raconteur and travel guide, historian and amateur chef.I enjoyed reading anecdotes about “France’s greatest chef” Georges Auguste Escoffier’s ascendancy to demi-deity by way of German prison camp in 1870; about the inv [...]

    • Damaskcat says:

      The author writes in an entertaining and enthusiastic style which really carries the reader along. He sets out to create the perfect meal from traditional French cooking. He travels throughout France to try and find the forgotten byways of French cooking. He tracks down such delicacies as lampreys, and mussels cooked by igniting pine needles and after much research he gets to hear of a village roasting a whole ox.We hear about Proust, madeleines and lime flower tea as well as reading about the a [...]

    • Sandi Widner says:

      A five star review for "The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of France" by John BaxterJohn Baxter's The Perfect Meal is part grand tour of France, part history of French cuisine, taking readers on a journey to discover and savor some of the world's great cultural achievements before they disappear completely.Some of the most revered and complex elements of French cuisine are in danger of disappearing as old ways of agriculture, butchering, and cooking fade and are forgotten. In this ch [...]

    • Ty Wilson says:

      This book has taught me far more than I ever thought I would know about French cuisine. John Baxter takes us on a trip across both time and France itself on a quest to discover the great lost recipes of France. From all corners of France he reports on the both the history of certain dishes as well as where we might find them today. France is a nation that is very proud of their cuisine and Mr. Baxter's love of it shows through in every story he tells. This often humorous book is a great introduc [...]

    • Maryellen says:

      This book showed flashes of genius. To me, John Baxter's voice feels like Peter Mayle crossed with Jeffrey Steingarten. Ultimately, though, something about the historical anecdotes just dragged too much to keep me interested enough to power through - I finished the book in spurts, almost as a bedtime story.The story is an intriguing one and some of the stories are hilarious, touching and interesting. I just couldn't get into it enough to give it more than 3 stars.

    • Mme LionHead says:

      This is not a particularly memorable book. There are bits and pieces of interesting anecdotes to the traditional, regional French cuisine, but overall the content itself is quite forgettable. I did enjoy reading about how people from a different culture than mine utilized locally-sourced food traditionally and how they improvised in times of need. I thought it was pretty amusing to learn how restaurants would serve street animals and zoo animals during hard times and yet be insulted if customers [...]

    • Abigail says:

      Enjoyed The Most Beautiful Walk in the World better. But this was good & fun. The tidbits about food origins were intriguing to me. So many interesting facts. Description of onion soup had me craving a bowl.

    • Debbie says:

      John Baxter is an Australian who has lived in Paris for more than twenty years and gives literary walking tours through the city. The result of those tours is contained in The Most Beautiful Walk in the World.In The Perfect Meal which calls “part grand tour of France, part history of French cuisine” he takes “readers on a journey to discover and savor some of the world’s great cultural achievements before they disappear completely.”The Perfect Meal: In Search of the Lost Tastes of Fra [...]

    • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance says:

      Some writers have all the fun. John Baxter, an expat twenty-year Paris-ite and writer, decides to set off around France in search of all the wonderful classic French dishes which are gradually becoming extinct. He seeks out kir and pineau and pastis and absinthe. He looks for the very best caviar. He samples macarons and cannelé and madeleines. He checks out truffles and lamphrey eels and bouillabaisse and soupe à l'oignon (onion soup) and even le bœuf en broche (an ox on a spit).Even I, who [...]

    • Pam says:

      Have you ever wondered what it would have been like to sit at a French table in the early 1900's? What type of food would you have been served? What would it have taken to prepare the food? This wonderful story challenges the imagination and answers all of those questions and so much more. This is the story of a man in search of a special meal. The reader travels with him as he completes the research, samples numerous foods, and learns the history of so many foods. Many of these foods are seldom [...]

    • Kristin Strong says:

      I liked it. No stronger feelings either way.John Baxter sets out to plan (but not implement) the menu for an old-fashioned, multi-course French feast. He includes, among other things, the aperitif, seafood, soups, and beef. The cover copy made me think he was going to list specific traditional French foods and go in search of them in Paris and throughout the country, and he sort of does that, but with digressions into actually trying to prepare some of the dishes himself and his personal history [...]

    • Nicole says:

      I almost gave up on this book on page 33 where Baxter misspells the name of French politician Jean Jaurès as Juarès not once, not twice, but THREE TIMES on the same page. The fourth time, it's spelled correctly, so clearly this is just horribly bad editing. But I continued to read anyway. The book is a delightful culinary romp through France, every bit as educational and entertaining as Baxter always is. Most of the food described is a little outside the realm of normal tastes nowadays, so I'm [...]

    • Susan says:

      Something about this book drove me crazy and I couldn't put my finger on why until I got to the section where he wrote about Tzimmes a famous Jewish dish that I grew up eating, have made, and have read about in countless Jewish cookbooks. Everything he wrote was incorrect, Tzimmes is not just a way to combine and use up leftovers and certainly isn't "carrot soup." If he is wrong about something that is as easy to research as Tzimmes then what else was incorrect? Then I realized what I didn't lik [...]

    • Christine says:

      An interesting yarn about French cuisine and small towns and regions of France that are unknown even to Francophiles like me. If you enjoy cooking and food, you will enjoy this book. If you enjoy France and travel-writing, you will enjoy this book. (If you fit both categories, you'll definitely like this book.) I wouldn't take his "quest" for the perfect meal too seriously. I think it's just a plot device to tie together interesting and funny anecdotes about the food specialties of various parts [...]

    • Melanie Coombes says:

      This was an informative, likable story about one man's quest to indulge in the original French dishes before they disappear. He scours the countryside tasting dishes, finding ingredients and people who make fresh, hearty "authentic" food.Along the way, the author entertains us with background information and facts on French cooking and eating. I always enjoy books about food and the dedication and effort that goes into creating and then savoring a simple, but delicious meal. I liked the history [...]

    • Terrance Gelenter says:

      Baxter is at it again, taking up knife and fork on our behalf. This time he is traversing the French hexagon in search of The Perfect Meal-a banquet of lost and unusual recipes, Along the way he savors a whole roast ox-no, not the entire ox, pintade à l’Escoffier and some items that seem to only appear in The New York Times crossword puzzle-lamprey.John Baxter’s The Perfect Meal is part grand tour of France, part history of French cuisine, taking readers on a journey to discover and savor s [...]

    • Sarah Rosenbaum says:

      If you like France and French food, this book, written by an Aussie with a quick sense of humor is sure to satisfy. I think I would need to take a month off from work to prepare to execute the perfect menu and another month to clean up and recover, but it would be a worthy endeavor. My favorite quote in this book is that of Antoine de Saint Exupery, author of The Little Prince. He observed "Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when the is nothing more to take away." [...]

    • Robert says:

      The author sets out on a quest to create an imaginary menu encompassing the most representational foods of France, some of which have fallen out of fashion, like lampreys. It seemed like a thin premise for a book, an intellectual exercise, since he never intended to put this meal together. Baxter recounts some familiar tales, such as Mitterand's last meal, but includes enough new material and interesting anecdotes that I kept reading. His writing is also personable, and sometimes even fun.

    • Leander Mitchell says:

      Just loved this book as would anyone who loves Paris and French food. John has this great writing style that is very engaging and he weaves stories for the reader encompassing real time experience and history. And then on top of that, he builds in such interesting characters. One of the things I like most about John's writing style is that he takes you with him on the journey, makes for a real page turner but you are sad to say goodbye.

    • Amuse says:

      If you like food, France, history, cultural milestones in gastronomy, Dali or Alice B. Toklas, read this book. The author is Australian (a whole other dimension). I thoroughly enjoyed this, enough to keep going back to it after my reading was derailed for days or weeks at a time. MMMMM for the book.

    • Linda Smatzny says:

      The author is an Australian by birth but has lived in Europe for decades. He decides to try to make the perfect meal not so much in real but mostly in his mind. He is looking for the perfect French meal that uses real food like it used to be cooked in France. He journeys to various parts of France researching the various dishes. The book just flows.

    • Linda says:

      An interesting book written by an Australian long resident in Paris. It seemed to be more like a series of articles than a book though. Baxter imagines what a long and perfect French banquet would be and travels the country side investigating food, cooking and customs. An interesting read for those who love France and French food.

    • Jean Grant says:

      Several years ago, I went on a tour of the 6th arrondissement led by author John Baxter, courtesy of the Paris Writers Workshop. He's genial, but I had no idea what a magnificent writer he is. He's got VOICE, so much so I might well recognize his writing if I saw a few unattributed sentences. Nothing here is dry. Nothing gives the feel of fact-checking. It reads like a charm.

    • Eve Aronoff says:

      A delicious historical trip through France. Learned so much about Escoffier - didn't know he created the military-style line cooking that kitchens still employ today! Loved all of the different parts of France that Baxter introduces the reader to.

    • Melissa says:

      Witty, sarcastic and the part with the flaming Brazilian barbecue skewers was a laugh out loud till I cry moment. Good, entertaining read and picking up new knowledge on food is a definite plus point.

    • Kirsten says:

      Loved every second of this book. Entertaining, informative and hunger inducing. Baxter is a very engaging writer, imparting interesting facts along with his views on food and eating. I'll certainly be keeping my eye out for more of his work.

    • Becky Diamond says:

      A delicious trip through France focusing on the dishes that have had major culinary significance over the years. Witty, interesting and well-written, with a sprinkling of historical tidbits that remind me of some of the nuggets I found when writing the Thousand Dollar Dinner. An entertaining read.

    • Donna says:

      A marvellous memory for detail, little unexpected facts, snatches of history and menus that sound better to read than eat. I have read a number of his books, all very easy to read, this is one of the better ones.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *