The Baskerville Legacy: A Confession

The Baskerville Legacy A Confession I like the way your mind works said Doyle We should work on something together Pool our resources What do you say I said I would enjoy that very much When a young journalist Bertram Fletcher Robinso

  • Title: The Baskerville Legacy: A Confession
  • Author: John O'Connell
  • ISBN: 9781907595462
  • Page: 338
  • Format: Hardcover
  • I like the way your mind works, said Doyle We should work on something together Pool our resources What do you say I said I would enjoy that very much.When a young journalist, Bertram Fletcher Robinson, meets his writer hero Arthur Conan Doyle on a troop ship coming back from South Africa, he is delighted especially when the creator of Sherlock Holmes suggests th I like the way your mind works, said Doyle We should work on something together Pool our resources What do you say I said I would enjoy that very much.When a young journalist, Bertram Fletcher Robinson, meets his writer hero Arthur Conan Doyle on a troop ship coming back from South Africa, he is delighted especially when the creator of Sherlock Holmes suggests they collaborate on a real creeper of a story But the experience will prove traumatic for both of them And when the result of their labours, The Hound of the Baskervilles, is finally published, it will be credited to one author alone Based on real events, The Baskerville Legacy is a creeper in its own right a thrilling, frequently terrifying exploration of friendship and rivalry, love and lust, ambition and the limits of talent It takes us from the clattering heart of Edwardian London to the eerie stillness of ancient West Country moorland, where a treacherous mire might swallow a man in seconds
    • Unlimited [Memoir Book] Õ The Baskerville Legacy: A Confession - by John O'Connell ✓
      338 John O'Connell
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Memoir Book] Õ The Baskerville Legacy: A Confession - by John O'Connell ✓
      Posted by:John O'Connell
      Published :2019-01-02T00:55:34+00:00

    462 Comment

    • Michael says:

      I like to get something Holmesian each Christmas, and this was 2011's offering.Being a fictionalised account of the collaboration between Arthur Conan Doyle and Bertram Fletcher Robinson on The Hound of the Baskervilles, I did wonder as I read through quite how much was real and how much fiction. Fortunately, O'Connell provides an Afterword in which all is clarified.So, an interesting book, which gets better in its second half, when Doyle and Robinson are scouting locations for The Hound in Dart [...]

    • cj says:

      This is a strange little book. It's obviously been enthusiastically researched, and there's a geeky kind of fun in all the period details, and in the characterisation of Doyle and Whatsisname, neither of whom come out of it looking particularly good. And it's a quick read and a lovely edition, and I suppose its evocation of a transitional time period is quite interesting--the recent death of Queen Victoria, the women's suffrage movement, new developments in science coupled in an odd way with Doy [...]

    • Devin Prouty says:

      I'm a huge fan of mysteries and Sherlock Holmes, however this book has neither. A fictionalized account of a theorized collaboration between an annoying reporter and ACD. I only slogged through to the end because it was short, and to see if something would happen at some point. It didn't, save yourself the time, read something else, maybe a phone book.

    • Tony Mac says:

      What an odd little novella this book is. It starts out like it's going to be a fun spin on the Hound of the Baskervilles, giving an entertaining alternative telling on the origins of the famous Sherlock Holmes story. But gradually it becomes something quite different: darker, more spiteful and - frankly - more pointless.Ultimately, this book is little more than a peculiar trash job on two long-dead, real-life men: Arthur Conan Dolye and a long-forgotten journalist Bertram Robinson. Exactly why t [...]

    • Michael Brown says:

      Stars out as a nice story about an author/ newspaper editor returning from the Boer War who meets Conan Doyle and they become friends and plan to write a story together. Conan Doyle is not very well treated but follows most of the known facts of his personality and beliefs. The newspaper man is also based on a real person but is not likeable and poorly developed. The story bends too many known facts and adds lots of supposition. Supporting characters are not likeable at all and poorly developed. [...]

    • Mary says:

      An interesting little read. I like that it is based upon fact.

    • Jeannette says:

      I really love all things about Sherlock Holms, but this book was not only a waste of time but a major disappointment.

    • Jane says:

      A small, black, hardback book, with gold lettering and creamy-white pages. It could be a pocket-book or a diary, and it could be an eminently suitable place to make a record of events to be set aside for some future date when the truth may, finally, be told.And that is just what this book is. It is the testimony of Bertram Fletcher Robinson, making clear his role in the creation of The Hound of the Baskervilles. I hadn't heard of Bertram Fletcher Robinson before I spotted this book, but I was qu [...]

    • Hana Howard says:

      Baskerville is an intriguing novel based on the apparent friendship of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, a young journalist who aspires to have Doyle not only as his mentor but also as co- author on a mystery novel. They mystery is one of a literary question. Did Doyle use the ideas of Robinson for his famous novel The Hound of the Baskervilles? It is based on real events; however there is much written that is speculative because of a lack of recorded evidence. The author bl [...]

    • Jill Elizabeth says:

      I really liked it - until it rather abruptly ended It was an intriguing concept and the relationship between the men was well developed, with a back-and-forth-ness to the descriptions of Conan Doyle that I find quite interesting and enjoyable. Then, all of a sudden, it ended. Abruptly. With a series of afterword-type bits that left me confused and felt oddly disjointed. I have read the real Baskerville - it doesn't leave one wanting This story felt cut off at the end, like someone told the autho [...]

    • Lynne says:

      Interesting, very well researched but oddly dissatisfying in that it was quite hard to decide what the author was actually writing about. Part confessional, part revelation, this purports to be the memoir of Bertram Robinson, a journalist who apparently collaborated with ACD on what would become 'The Hound of the Baskervilles.' The author admits that he has imagined a lot of the detail and changed the apparently stolid Robinson into a drug-addicted, prostitute-using figure who may or may not hav [...]

    • Craig Cote says:

      This was an interesting exploration into the history of the return of Sherlock Holmes. As much as I've enjoyed reading Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes stories since childhood, I've never gotten interested in the story behind the stories. I knew Doyle was a spiritualist because of other things I've read, but that was about it.I'm honestly not sure if there was enough background material to build a compelling story from. While the exercise of this novel was interesting (let's build a fiction from [...]

    • Diana Oliveira says:

      This book was good enough.I was amused by the fact that it might be somewhat a serious account of how the Hound of the Baskervilles was written. I am after all a great Sherlock Holmes fan. But by the end of it when John O'Connell confesses that most of it is made-up i get a sense of boredom.I guess that knowing that ACD was a huge horrid person is amusing, even if not comforting, but i was hoping for a far more "ringing of truth" account.Can say great things come from reading this book.It is und [...]

    • Larry says:

      Bertram Fletcher Robinson and Arthur Conan Doyle jointly created the ideas behind "The Hound of the Baskervilles" while on a hiking trip on the moors, though Doyle hogged the credit upon publication. O'Connell continues the devaluation of Robinson by portraying him as an unreliable, drug addled wastrel, though Robinson wasn't any of those things. O'Connell confesses that he did so out of "authorial necessity," meaning that the truth wasn't sufficiently interesting for his artistic purposes.

    • Rena Sherwood says:

      Let me get one thing clear: Sherlock Holmes does NOT appear in this book. Neither does the Hound. It was a book that began promisingly and then quickly degenerated into common muck.One thing that was NOT clear was the title of this book. My library's edition stated that this was called Baskerville, NOT Baskerville Legacy: A Confession. In the afterward, the author seemed to have no idea as to what title his book is. Sloppy work, folks.

    • Barbara Bengston says:

      It was an okay story about the fictional collaboration between Fletcher Robinson and Conan Doyle in developing the Hound of the Baskervilles story. I initially found this story boring, but it improved at the end.

    • Marilyn Belsham says:

      I'm such a huge Sherlock Holmes fan that I assumed this would be a slam dunk. I also like books that intertwine actual history with fiction, but I found the story to be plodding and difficult to get through. Pity.

    • Krissy says:

      Uneventful historical fiction about the collaboration between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Bertram "Bertie" Fletcher Robinson in writing The Hound of the Baskervilles. I feel like this could have been so much better! An interesting concept, uninterestingly written.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *